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Wednesday, September 5, 2012

LeMay - America's Car Museum

August 25th, while we were waiting for Sonja and Roland to arrive in Tacoma we thought we'd pay our entry fee into the Ace Cafe Summer Shakedown, thereby acquiring the coveted wrist band allowing us entrance into the LeMay America's Car Museum.

The LeMay is a recent addition to Tacoma having only opened it's doors on June 2, 2012. For some interesting information regarding Harold LeMay and the museum click the link here ----> LINK.

We had about two hours before we needed to meet them for lunch so it gave us ample opportunity to wander.

(LeMay America's Car Museum - Tacoma, WA)

(1963 Corvette Sting Ray)

(1953 Citroen 2CV)

(1956 Messerschmitt - KR200)

( A different view of the 1956 Messerschmitt)

(1965 AMC Rambler Marlin)

(AMC Rambler Marlin)

(1906 Cadillac Model M, Tulip Tourer)

(1906 Cadillac Model M - 1 cylinder, 10 hp, 98.2 Cubic inches)

(They had some bikes too - 1956 BSA Goldstar Clubman)

And I took some artsy photos:






And back to the cars and bikes........

(1922 Ford - love the Horseless carriage license plate)

(1926 Oldsmobile Holden 30D)

(1951 Studebaker Champion Starlight Coupe)

(AJS motorcycle, not sure of the year or model)

(1960 Lambretta Series II - L150 Special)

(Derby Express Greyhound Scooter, 1 cyl, 50 cc)

(Oldsmobile Curved Dash circa 1905-ish)

(1919 Stanley Steamer, 20 hp, direct drive set up)

(edit - 1911 battery powered Baker Electric - thanks Richard)

Wilma..........

(1994 Flintmobile George Barris Kustom)

(1930 Duesenburg Model J)

(1930 Rolls Royce Town car, sold new for $19,965 in 1930)

The Speed Zone had great wallpaper to make it look like the cars were moving really fast when taking photos.

(1948 Kurtis Agajanian - achieved pole position at the 1950 Indy 500)

(1938 Gulf-Miller, Gulf Oil commissioned Harry Miller to build this car)

(1931 Cummins Diesel Special.  Utilizing a modified Duesenberg car chassis a Cummins 360 cu in 4 cylinder engine was installed.  Most known for finishing the race distance on one tank of fuel and in 13th place with Dave Evans driving in 1931)

These two were kept under glass:

(Pesaro Motobi - 125 cc - I think)

(1967 Norton Atlas, 740 cc)

I think that is most of the pictures we took inside the museum.  I believe Troubadour took a few of the British car exhibit that I will post up one day if he decides not to do a follow-up post.

When we woke Sunday morning the view from our hotel window was of the LeMay.  

(Apparently a Corvette show was happening on Sunday)
(Notice the motorcycles lining up on the upper lot for their Sunday ride)

I hope you enjoyed this little tour through the LeMay America's Car Museum.  In my humble opinion, it is well worth the $14 admission price if you ever find yourself in Tacoma, Washington.

- Au Revoir

" I know a lot about cars man.  I can look at a car's headlight and tell you exactly which way it's coming." - Mitch Hedberg
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26 comments:

  1. Thats a nice collection of cars and bikes. I liked the 1948 Kurtis Agajanian. Maybe put that up against the Flintmobile and see which one wins.

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    1. Glad you liked them.

      Of course now I am singing the theme song for the Flintsones. I keep doing that when I see that car.

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    2. The Flintmobile KICKS ASS! I want one :)

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    3. Would have been better to find it in someone's front yard on a back road somewhere.

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  2. I love the old Corvettes. They had real style. And that Citroen always makes me smile. Looks like you had a good time!

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    1. We did have a good time. I am glad you liked the pics and I could make you smile.

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  3. Team Lotus...Jimmy Clark's car? The I don't know is an electric the name I can't remember.

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    1. It was in the alternative energy section besides the steamer so electric makes sense.

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  4. Trobairitz:

    Before this museum was built, Harold LeMay used to host an open house on his property in Tacoma for one day a year. We went the last year he hosted this event and got to meet him in person. He was also driving the double decker british shuttle bus bringing passengers from the parking lot to his "home" and I don't think many knew that he was "Harold". We saw many of his cars which were housed in many buildings. He also collected many other things which you may not be aware. He had a Fire engine collection, as well as a large doll collection. His private residence was also on this property and we also met Mrs Lemay. You would be surprised at how modest his home was

    bob
    Riding the Wet Coast
    My Flickr // My YouTube

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    1. You sir are a wealth of information. Thanks for the story about seeing his collection. Apparently they have over 3,000 cars in their collection and they will be rotating them through the museum to keep it fresh.

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    2. Trobairitz:

      of course I have lots of photos, but they are all on negatives in whatever box I don't know. I have one with Mrs Skoot helping "Harold" over a rope divider. He bought a Military Academy, just for the buildings to store his cars. It is on another site not far from his home. Click for info HERE <-- Richard type hyperlink

      I am not sure that your admission to the LeMay museum covers entrance to Marymount. You will have to make another visit (Hint)

      when we poked our heads into the Gymnasium, it was full to the rafters with Chevrolets of all types. This included Corvettes and lots of early 60's cars. They even needed a forklift to raise them to the rafters. You could see them from the ground, but no access to see them up close. Of course it may not be like this now. We saw them in their original state before the Foundation took over.

      bob
      Riding the Wet Coast
      My Flickr // My YouTube


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  5. I think the "I'm not sure what this was, but I liked the wooden wheels" is a Baker Electric from around the turn of the century. Wonderful photos and one more place to add to the mythical list.

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    1. Ding Ding, I think we have a winner.

      Now that you mention it, I think there was a sign by the one car that said Baker Electric. Sure wish I had of taken a picture of the darn sign like I did the Steamer beside it.

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    2. I did more digging on the interweb - it is 1911 battery powered Baker Electric on display at the LeMay - thank Richard.

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  6. That place looks facinating, like somewhere I could get lost in for hours. Thanks for sharing Brandy. I really dont think I could pick a favourite out of that lot. Love the artsy photos everything is so shiny. That day was a really glittery affair wasnt it :)

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    1. We actually wandered around it twice and I am sure we still missed stuff. It was glittery. All the cars and bikes were polished and shiny for showing. Of course the brilliant sunshine added to it.

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  7. Some beautiful cars! Funny...I saw that reclining hood ornament on a Packard last weekend. :)

    The Baker Electric has an interesting shape with those windows.

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    1. Who knew those reclining Packard ornaments were so popular.

      I thought the Baker was kind of cool with the shape too. I think it even had lace curtains tied back.

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  8. To me, they are art - Great photos.

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    1. Thank you m'lday. There sure were some beautiful cars.

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  9. Loving the detail on some of these old rides!! Ah, the days when cars were cars.

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    1. They had so much style back then. Not so much now days.

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  10. Nice photos of some Cracking Vehicles.
    TT

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    1. Thank you Tony. We had fun wandering around and looking at them for several hours.

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  11. Great job on the photography! I like the Messerschmitt the best. Although the Flintstone mobile is pretty awesome, too.

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    1. Thanks Kathy. There were so many cool cars and bikes and scooters there it was hard to take them all in.

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